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The Blessed Sacrament

Posté par diaconos le 19 juin 2019

The Blessed Sacrament, also Most Blessed Sacrament, is a devotional name used in the Latin Church of the Catholic Church, as well as in Anglicanism, Lutheranism, Methodism,[1] and the Old Catholic Church, as well as in some of the Eastern Catholic Churches, to refer to the body and blood of Christ in the form of consecrated sacramental bread and wine at a celebration of the Eucharist. In the Byzantine Rite, the terms Holy Gifts and Divine Mysteries are used to refer to the consecrated elements.

The Blessed Sacrament, also Most Blessed Sacrament, is a devotional name used in the Latin Church of the Catholic Church, as well as in Anglicanism, Lutheranism, Methodism,[1] and the Old Catholic Church, as well as in some of the Eastern Catholic Churches, to refer to the body and blood of Christ in the form of consecrated sacramental bread and wine at a celebration of the Eucharist. In the Byzantine Rite, the terms Holy Gifts and Divine Mysteries are used to refer to the consecrated elements.

Gospel → They ate and were all satisfied »

Gospel according to holy Luke

11b And he received them and spoke to them about the kingdom of God. And
those who were in need of cures, he healed.
12 Then the day began to decline. And drawing near, the twelve said
to him: “Dismiss the crowds, so that, by going into the surrounding
towns and villages, they may separate and find food. For we are here in
a deserted place.”
13 But he said to them, “You give them something to eat.” And they
said, “There is with us no more than five loaves and two fish, unless
perhaps we are to go and buy food for this entire multitude.”
14 Now there were about five thousand men. So he said to his disciples, “Have them recline to eat in groups of fifty.”
15 And they did so. And they caused them all to recline to eat.
16 Then, taking the five loaves and the two fish, he gazed up to
heaven, and he blessed and broke and distributed them to his disciples,
in order to set them before the crowd.
17 And they all ate and were satisfied. And twelve baskets of fragments were taken up, which were left over from them. (Lk 9, 11b-17)

Homily → God invites us to his table

Every day God invites us to his table. Isn’t that incredibly wonderful? He puts in our outstretched hands the true bread of Life. Moreover, he makes us ourselves become beings given for others, full partners in his project of universal salvation. Let us give him thanks for this incomparable gift.

Today is the feast of the Most Holy Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Christ, the Sacrament of God’s love for humanity. On this Feast of the Blessed Sacrament, the Church invites us to become ever more aware of the active presence in our midst, among us, of the risen Jesus.  He is truly there, alive, present, acting, giving himself as food to make the child of God that we have been since our baptism grow in us.

For a long time, God had prepared his people to see him under the signs of bread and wine. Already in Abraham’s time, he had begun to give a sign to the chosen people that one day a special envoy would come who would repeat the ritual gestures of the high priest Melkizedek offering Abraham bread and wine to restore him. (First reading) The Fathers of the Church and the first Christians saw in this offering a sign of the Eucharist. Melchisedek announced Jesus’ gesture of filling the people in the name of God with the gift of bread, thus prefiguring Jesus’ Eucharistic gesture.

Israel’s tradition had kept alive the memory of a providential intervention where God had fed his failing people in the desert. After the coming out of Egypt, God had given them quails and manna; the latter was truly a bread from heaven, therefore from God. Later, Jesus will feed the failing people at the end of a long day; it is this event that we have called the multiplication of loaves. During the episode of the multiplication of the loaves, the accounts report four main actions of Jesus that will later be found at the Last Supper.

As at Mass, the meal that Jesus offered to this crowd began with a liturgy of the Word. You have to be there from the beginning to be nourished by this Jesus who speaks of the Kingdom of God. This is the Word that liberates men, the message that opens all humanity to God.

The food that Jesus would offer him after this teaching was not only intended to satisfy the hunger of these people, even if, first of all, it played this role.  « Man does not live by bread alone!  » (Lk 4, 4)

Parents and educators you have an important mission that God has entrusted to you. Your children are not only mouths to feed or intelligences to develop, they are also souls to open to the spiritual dimension. Matthew clarifies and goes further by noting in his account: « It is not only bread that man must live by, but every word that comes out of God’s mouth. «  (Mt 4, 4)

Which means that caring for your belly shouldn’t be your first concern. You must work to earn a living and bread, but you must also work to earn your eternal life. And to nourish your soul with eternal life, there are the words that come out of God’s mouth.

The fruit full of life has matured on the wood of the Cross: it is the true food and drink that satisfies and quenches our hearts. It is a sharing of divine life. « He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood dwells in me and I in him. «  (Jn 6, 56)

« Jesus took the five loaves and the two fishes and, looking up to heaven, he blessed them, broke them, and gave them to his disciples to distribute to all the world.  » (Lk 9, 17).

It is the same succession of the four sacred gestures that we find in the account of the Last Supper on Holy Thursday as well as in that of the Emmaus meal. When the priest, servant of Jesus, does these four gestures of Jesus among us again during Mass, it is Jesus who really does them for us and makes himself present. The Eucharist can make us meet in faith the risen Christ, conqueror of evil and death, savior of man.

This broken and given bread is the sign that God has chosen to be with us. This bread is the very person of Jesus who is given to us. Let us therefore celebrate in joy and thanksgiving this feast of the Blessed Sacrament, the feast of Christ’s presence among men. Let us receive the Body of Christ with great faith and sincere love.
Amen

Michel Houyoux, permanent deacon

External links

◊ Priests, Deacons, and Brothers — Apostles of the Eucharist →   Welcome – Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament

The Blessed Sacrament

Image de prévisualisation YouTube

Publié dans Catéchèse, Enseignement, fêtes religieuses, homélies particulières, La messe du dimanche, Page jeunesse, Religion, Temps ordinaire | Pas de Commentaire »

 

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